Journal

AW21 LOOKBOOK - INTO THE FOREST

Designer: Dan Snyder
Photographers: Eric Chakeen & Phoenix Johnson
Set Designer: Joe Garvey
Producer/Stylist: Jacqueline Hur
Stylist Assistant: Jonathan Roensch

 

 

AW21 LOOKBOOK - INTO THE FOREST | AW21 LOOKBOOK - INTO THE FOREST | AW21 LOOKBOOK - INTO THE FOREST | AW21 LOOKBOOK - INTO THE FOREST

 

This year has forced us to look outwards and inwards at the same - being inside has made us both introspective and desperate to be in nature. The collection, Into the Forest, reflects the juxtaposition of inner feeling of connection to self and outwards focus of being part of the natural world - both forms of coming back to oneself. The colors, derived from deep forest colors of the late fall - russet, crimson, coffee, crimson and thrush, evoke a natural setting just before the branches go bare. The textiles and knits are blended to camouflage into the natural setting rather than to stand out - settling in for comfort and ease.

- Dan Snyder / Designer + Founder

Corridor 2021

WSJ: CROCHET CLOTHES

Words: Jacob Gallagher

Our designer and founder, Dan Snyder, is featured in the Wall Street Journal article titled: Crochet Clothes: Not Just for Grannies Anymore, about knitwear and the rise of crochet. Read the article below to find out more.

 

WSJ: CROCHET CLOTHES | WSJ: CROCHET CLOTHES | WSJ: CROCHET CLOTHES | WSJ: CROCHET CLOTHES | WSJ: CROCHET CLOTHES

 

As a child in rural Virginia, Ray Prunty would watch his aunts and grandmother craft comely crochet throws to pass the time. Today, the 23-year-old sales assistant in Richmond, Va., proudly plops a hat crocheted in a grid of “granny squares” by Philadelphia’s Stahl Knit on his head several times a week. Mr. Prunty, who said he “grew up on crochet,” was attracted to the cap’s prismatic color scheme and its cozy nostalgia value.

Stahl Knit is one of a number of small-scale labels—some with just one employee— producing colorful, handmade clothing using crochet, a traditional hook-needle crafting technique. These designs include a fluffy sweater pieced together from large red, purple and aqua granny squares by California’s Chamula; a delicate, almost lace-like crochet tank top from New York’s Bode; and a sprawling handmade scarf dotted with on-the-nose peace signs from England’s Story MFG. Some larger fashion brands also produce pieces that appear hand-crocheted but are machine-made.

Earlier this year, Brett Hymes, 29, a writer in Santa Clarita, Calif., purchased an oatmeal- colored granny-square cardigan from New York’s Corridor that was handmade in Peru. The sweater has a pleasing “grandpa vibe” to it, said Mr. Hymes. Indeed, crochet epitomizes down-home comfort. The tightknit sitcom family on “Roseanne” (which premiered in 1988 and ran for 10 seasons) kept a crocheted throw draped across its plaid couch throughout the show’s run.

Crochet also conjures the ’60s, when young people traipsed around in shawls and tops fabricated from multicolored yarns. Corridor’s cardigans were, in fact, inspired by an image of a shaggy-haired Paul McCartney wearing a bluish crochet vest on the set of “The Magical Mystery Tour,” the Beatles’ 1967 British television movie. “There’s all sorts of flower-power stuff happening now,” said Dan Snyder, Corridor’s owner, noting that his sweaters slot into a larger throwback moment.

“There’s all sorts of
flower-power stuff
happening now,”
- Dan Snyder

 

Although this summer didn’t end up being a repeat of the freewheeling summers in late- 1960s America, as some had hoped, brands like Tache Clothing and Wild Orange Tree have been selling hippified, sleeveless crochet dresses and loose crochet crop tops. These flowy knits, in vibrant oranges, purples and greens, wouldn’t have looked out of place in the Haight in 1969.

“Our customer definitely is always seeking an element of nostalgia,” said Madeline Sensibile, manager of content and partnerships at Lisa Says Gah, an e-commerce site out of Los Angeles and San Francisco that sells a slew of crochet pieces. Some of its most popular items include amusingly quaint tank tops made from vintage granny squares by the Series, a small company out of New York. Shoppers are “always looking for that playfulness in their outfits,” said Ms. Sensibile. “It’s the idea of getting something that’s vintage, but also reworked for now.”

Some fans of the look have even taken to crocheting themselves. A couple of years ago, Ella Dixon, 23, a cheesemonger who lives in Rockaway, N.J., taught herself to crochet via YouTube. She’s since turned the hobby into a business, generating around $400 a month selling various crochet goods including cardigans and tanks through her own website. Though some pieces take her around 60 hours total to make, Ms. Dixon cherishes the diversion. “I usually crochet before work, after work. I crochet nonstop,” she said.

At-home crocheters like Ms. Dixon sparked what Marian Park, the strategist for trend forecasting company WGSN, called “the craftcore” movement. This trend is led by young, DIY-driven folks who’ve embraced the magical, time-passing powers of knitting and crocheting. (The most famous fresh-faced knitter is Tom Daley, the 27-year-old British swimmer who knit in his spare hours between winning medals at the Tokyo Olympics.) Making one’s clothes, or even buying from small, homespun crocheters like Stahl Knit, also satisfies a desire to be environmentally friendly. Ms. Dixon referred to crochet as “slow fashion,” a painstaking process that represents a deliberate alternative to faddish, low-quality fast fashion.

 

Corridor 2021

TODODS SANTOS WITH PHOENIX + JULIA

Phoenix Johnson is a New York-based photographer. Join us on a trip with him and his friend, and model, Julia as they explore the beaches and nightlife of Todos Santos, Mexico.

 

 

TODODS SANTOS WITH PHOENIX + JULIA | TODODS SANTOS WITH PHOENIX + JULIA | TODODS SANTOS WITH PHOENIX + JULIA

Julia in the Fuzzy Olive Flannel, Washed Summer Indigo T-Shirt, and the Organic Cotton - Stone Bucket Hat

Julia in the Linen Glenplaid - Natural.

Above: Our Banana Hawaiian SS, Olive Oxford Canvas Shorts, Natural Coordinates Rockaway Cap and some really cool goggles.

Julia in the Waffle Madras.

Julia, poolside in the Ticking Stripe Linen Overshirt - Natural.

Corridor 2021

CORRIDOR FOR KENNEDY MAGAZINE - ISSUE 12

Words: Dan Snyder
Photos: Eric Chakeen

Kennedy Magazine is a biannual journal based in Athens, Greece. Its aim is to explore the views and ideas of certain individuals that have influenced their aesthetics and cultural wanderings in one way or another. It's a journal about the people and places they love. A collection of words and images that are revisited from time to time when like-minded readers will look for inspiration and a familiar intimate place. Read our featured article, written by Corridor designer and founder, Dan Snyder, about COVID-19 and it's impact on us.

 

CORRIDOR FOR KENNEDY MAGAZINE - ISSUE 12 | CORRIDOR FOR KENNEDY MAGAZINE - ISSUE 12 | CORRIDOR FOR KENNEDY MAGAZINE - ISSUE 12

 

In February, we closed our stores as the wave of COVID-19 hit. We stuffed ourselves in our apartments and waited and panicked and waited for the virus to end. After a few weeks of the exhausting news cycle, many people, including myself, settled in for the long haul. The simmering anxiety, listening to, and sometimes participating in the clattering of pans and bells at 7 PM, walking the tightrope of life and death in the narrow aisle ways of Key Foods, not knowing what was to come.

It’s now October and the panic has turned to a form of malaise. Working from home has become a meme, everyone in Brooklyn has a car, and midtown feels like the Walking Dead.

Since then, we’ve had the BLM movement and the city’s remarkable unity, and the subsequent looting of businesses, big and small. It was a surreal day when I could feel the electricity in the air, and that I knew that violence/looting or something was going to happen. Somehow, whether it was the news, or the subconscious unified field or whatever - everyone in Nolita got the memo, and the neighborhood turned from ghost town to construction zone. Every empty store had a contractor or expeditious store owner haphazardly cutting and drilling in plywood for the coming days - the evening before the coming storm. These boards stayed put until September, and in an interesting twist - the contractors are now back but this time at the restaurants preparing for winter.

This has been a bright spot, I feel, the Paris-ificiation of NY, outdoor dining giving life to streets, and a reprieve to otherwise desolate blocks. New Yorkers feel like they are outside more than ever because to be inside after all that quarantining is too much to bear. The parks are teeming with people.

This in sharp contrast to the mobile morgues and suspicious glances exchanged on the sidewalk. There has been community building, too.

There was a nightly block party on St James Place, where hundreds of people would dance to a sidewalk DJ at 7 PM. This felt like a community and provided an excellent reason to get out of your apartment and see some people.

The months have passed and it’s felt like years - so much has happened, so many people have died. My grandmother died of COVID, my best friend lost both of his grandparents, I had to permanently close the Williamsburg store. I guess I shouldn’t mourn the loss of my grandmother and the loss of my store in the same sentence, but building out a store- scrubbing the floor with your hands and bringing it to life - it’s a bit like creating an entity of some sort, a thing that exists and breathes and has a life of its own, so to snuff it out was difficult.

Going to my grandmother’s funeral was dreamlike - and I guess most funerals feel that way. It was August and it was so hot in suburban Baltimore at Sol Levinson’s funeral home where everyone I know/knew/still know has their services. We sat outside the building, socially distanced, while the rabbi remarked on my grandmother’s life. My sister couldn’t make it - she’s at risk and did not want to risk it. After I read my remarks I delivered hers. They were the best, painting the picture of my grandmother who lived her life as she damn well pleased: cigarettes, affairs, and burnt chocolate chip cookies. I wept as she was lowered into the ground and we recited the Mourner’s Kaddish. There was no shiva- no bagels or whitefish salad: that’s a separate tragedy worth noting.

Like everywhere, people are sick of it. New York, as it was, was already stressful, verging on manic. Have you ever witnessed Midtown Manhattan at 5-6 PM? Office workers are piling into the streets. So many people that the sidewalks are not big enough, the workers are moving as fast they can, speedwalking to Penn Station to get back to where they came from. Desperate to get out of the city. It feels a little like that everywhere now; the sidewalk isn’t big enough.

I’m a clothing designer and I guess I could remark on that, but it’s been a blur. Designing the SS21 Collection, producing AW20, and now we’re into AW21 - I’m surviving. I’m running as fast as I can, patching together what I can, and making things work as best I can as we limp into 2021.

 

 

For some 2020 was a great time to be a digital nomad. Flying to Tulum. Opening your laptop and you’re at work - this is not me. There are knowledge workers, and there are material workers, and if materials were your thing in 2020, you had to stay put. We had samples to fit and colors to adjust and plaids that needed new CADS. My work is touch and sight, and unless I have a full collection and dress forms, yarn books, and all of my other materials, I can’t do much. I guess that’s why I never left Brooklyn. I had to make it work. So this is my little NY pandemic missive. I’m confident that everyone has had a very different experience during this time. I’ve heard from more than a few people that quarantine suited them - they could work at home, get on their Peloton, walk around the block and rinse, repeat. This isn’t for me. I miss the city’s vibrancy. I don’t like the constant and omnipresent COVID-19 predicament, and I don’t think that’s going to stop anytime soon. But this is my home, and I love it. New York has allowed me to chase my dreams and become my most me, so I’m not leaving.

 

Corridor 2021

CORRIDOR FORT GREENE BY AARON BENGOCHEA

Aaron Bengochea is a photographer born and raised in Las Vegas, NV and based in NYC. Bengochea has been shooting photos from a young age, ever since his oldest sister purchased him a Polaroid camera. He's continued a career in photography, documenting interior spaces and anything that catches his eye. Join us as he photographs our Fort Greene location.

CORRIDOR FORT GREENE BY AARON BENGOCHEA | CORRIDOR FORT GREENE BY AARON BENGOCHEA | CORRIDOR FORT GREENE BY AARON BENGOCHEA

Corridor - Fort Greene
165 Dekalb Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11217

 

Corridor 2021

CORRIDOR NOLITA BY AARON BENGOCHEA

Aaron Bengochea is a photographer born and raised in Las Vegas, NV and based in NYC. Bengochea has been shooting photos from a young age, ever since his oldest sister purchased him a Polaroid camera. He's continued a career in photography, documenting interior spaces and anything that catches his eye. Join us as he photographs our Nolita location.

CORRIDOR NOLITA BY AARON BENGOCHEA | CORRIDOR NOLITA BY AARON BENGOCHEA | CORRIDOR NOLITA BY AARON BENGOCHEA

Corridor - Nolita
245 Elizabeth St
New York, NY 10012

 

Corridor 2021

AUGUST PLAYLIST + MOOD

WELCOME TO AUGUST - as Summer's heat begins to cool - squeeze the best, last drops out of the season. 

AUGUST PLAYLIST + MOOD | AUGUST PLAYLIST + MOOD | AUGUST PLAYLIST + MOOD | AUGUST PLAYLIST + MOOD | AUGUST PLAYLIST + MOOD

 

Corridor 2021

BRIGHTON BEACH SUMMER EDITORIAL

Join us on a short tour of Brighton Beach and order plemeni at Tatianna’s - that’s what we did. If you can’t make the trip, this should work as a decent replacement. Photos: Dan Snyder

BRIGHTON BEACH SUMMER EDITORIAL | BRIGHTON BEACH SUMMER EDITORIAL | BRIGHTON BEACH SUMMER EDITORIAL | BRIGHTON BEACH SUMMER EDITORIAL

Benji in the Hand Painted Selvedge Shirt, Natural Ticking Stripe Linen Drawstring Pants, and the Stone Bucket Hat

Benji in the SS Horseshoe Pocket - Gold Coast and the Rinsed Corridor Denim - Regular Fit 14oz

JULY PLAYLIST + MOOD

HERE COMES JULY - it's time for BBQs, bucket hats and beaches. Summertime is in full swing - apply and reapply - and don't forget your towel. It's time to soak up the sun.

JULY PLAYLIST + MOOD | JULY PLAYLIST + MOOD | JULY PLAYLIST + MOOD | JULY PLAYLIST + MOOD | JULY PLAYLIST + MOOD

 

Corridor 2021

GETTING COFFEE WITH HEAD Hi

Words: Martin Allen
Photos: Dan Snyder

Head Hi is a coffee/bookshop and arts space located in Fort Greene near our studio. We chatted with founders, Alexandra Hodkowski and Mösco Alocer, about the books they stock and the beans they brew.

 

 

GETTING COFFEE WITH HEAD Hi | GETTING COFFEE WITH HEAD Hi | GETTING COFFEE WITH HEAD Hi | GETTING COFFEE WITH HEAD Hi | GETTING COFFEE WITH HEAD Hi

Corridor: Tell us about yourselves?

Head Hi: We are the co-founders of Head Hi. Mösco is from Cuernavaca, Mexico (been living in New York for 21 years!) and Alexandra is from the mountains of Colorado (been in New York for 11 years). We left Manhattan for Brooklyn several years ago and absolutely love it.

We both have been immersed in the arts and in creative environments for a long time. Mösco is an artist and Alexandra studied art history and has worked for artists, in museums and non-profits. Books are essential to us and searching for special titles is our passion. Alexandra has a refined sense for finding incredible books, she’s extremely organized and has degrees in art history AND business/administration, which helps running our business. Mösco does most of the visuals and creative direction - he drew our logo and is an excellent barista!

What's the history of Head Hi? How long have you been around and how did the idea come about?

We’ve been open for 3 years now. We have both dedicated our lives to the arts. We have always loved the spontaneous dialogue, ideas and inspiration that is found at independent, off-the-beaten path book, record and coffee shops. We thought, “why not create that next in our neighborhood, a place that is home to many makers in the Navy Yard and surrounding area?” We also wanted to create a place to enjoy excellent specialty coffee, which was hard to find in our neighborhood before we opened.

Our focus is featuring mostly independent and self-published books on art, design and photography.

What can we expect in the future from Head Hi?

Now that we have gotten through our first year and then COVID-19 in our second year - the sky is the limit! We are constantly dropping new books into our webshop. We were just invited by our friends Love Injection to participate in an amazing weekender event located in upstate New York, put on by our favorite electronic music venue GoodRoom. Join us where we will be selling books poolside July 30-August 1 for Summer of Joy! In the Fall, we will be launching an amazing collaboration involving records (more details coming soon!) and we will have the Head Hi Book Kiosk at the New York Architecture and Design Film Festival.

Lastly, what have you been listening to/watching/reading these days?

We just watched an incredible movie 499. It is made in a style called magical realism combining real documentary footage of the harsh reality of modern-day Mexico with a fictional 16th century conquistador character. The scenes are so beautifully filmed by one of our favorite cinematographers Alejandro Mejia (who won an award for it at the Tribeca Film Festival).

At the shop every Saturday we listen to Love Injection’s show on The Lot Radio. We also love DJ Prince Klassen’s show Shared Time on Soho Radio.

We have different kinds of reading time, some are more visual or studious and others are more fun. For visual, we are loving all the New York findings of artist Yuji Agematsu in the book Four Seasons published by Sequence Press. For the more studious times, we are reading The Last Man Takes LSD and for more relaxed reading we are loving the latest magazines coming out such as balcony.

 

Thanks very much to Alex and Mösco for taking the time to chat with us. Head Hi is located in Ft Greene:

14 Clermont Avenue

Brooklyn, NY 11205

 

This upcoming weekend, join Corridor and Head Hi for a special pop up event in the Corridor Backyard. Coffee, tea and books will be available.

Corridor 2021

AT HOME WITH BALCONY MAGAZINE

Words: Martin Allen
Photos: Dan Snyder

Audrey Rose Smith (Editor in Chief) and Vicente Muñoz
(Creative Director) are the couple and creative force behind balcony, a new art magazine that focuses on personal,
artist-centric profiles. We met up with Audrey and Vicente
in their Clinton Hill home to chat about the mag and take some photos.

 

AT HOME WITH BALCONY MAGAZINE | AT HOME WITH BALCONY MAGAZINE | IN CONVERSATION WITH BALCONY MAG | AT HOME WITH BALCONY MAGAZINE

While the idea for the publication had been germinating for several years, balcony’s release was bolstered by the newfound free time brought about by the pandemic. “We found time to really connect with some great graphic designers to start getting this project going.”, Smith noted, specifically mentioning designers Ben Fehrman-Lee and Julia Novitch, who have been helping with the project from the very beginning.

A writer/editor and Sales Assistant at David Zwirner Gallery, Smith explains the origins of the mag. “It really stems from this interest in wanting to experience art and artists through a more humane and intimate lens.” Muñoz, a commercial photographer, designer and bonafide magazine junkie who’s new design space Estudio Piedras is currently in the works, notes that “the care that we have put into selecting and balancing the imagery together with the long-format interviews” makes it feel like a comprehensive and complete experience. “I think that people who are participating in the art world are going to relate to it and enjoy it”, he adds, citing the more-personal, less-stuffy style of balcony as a key factor.

By remixing the traditional artist profile, Smith and Muñoz blur the lines between the art world and the everyday. Smith states “I hope that balcony, in some ways, can sort of be the antithesis of what we understand as art journalism.”

balcony is available in print at Corridor Fort Greene, Corridor Nolita and online, here, at corridornyc.com

“It really stems from this interest in wanting to
experience art and artists
through a more humane
and intimate lens.” 
- Smith

“I think that people who are participating in the art world are going to relate to it and enjoy it”
- Muñoz

Corridor 2021

UPSTATE WITH CHLOÉ HORSEMAN

Chloé Horseman is a photographer based in New York. Join us on a photo walk with her and her partner Hayden as they capture the essence of Kerhonkson, New York.

Chloé Horseman is a 24 year old photographer from
a small town Georgia. She currently resides in Kerhonkson, NY. She has one self published book, “Outtakes” and shoots for many
fashion brands around the world.

 

Upstate with Chloé Horseman | Upstate with Chloé Horseman | Upstate with Chloé Horseman | Upstate with Chloé Horseman

Hayden is wearing the Ticking Stripe Linen Overshirt - Indigo, Olive Paisley Handblock - Veg Dye Shorts and Natural Coordinates Rockaway Cap.

Hayden is wearing the Perfect Denim Shirt LS, Dusty Rose Drawstring Shorts and Dove Grey Recess Runners.

Hayden is wearing the Embroidered Bouquet Hawaiian - Natural and the Dusty Rose Drawstring Shorts.

Hayden is wearing the Open Weave Overshirt - Dusty Rose and the Natural Linen Cotton Trousers.

Corridor 2021

JUNE PLAYLIST + MOOD

NY IS BACK BABY - go to a party, meet a stranger, leave the dance floor at 6AM light on your feet and bright in your mind. New season, new perspectives, new beginnings - say yes and enjoy your summer; you deserve it.

JUNE PLAYLIST + MOOD | JUNE PLAYLIST + MOOD | JUNE PLAYLIST + MOOD | JUNE PLAYLIST + MOOD | JUNE PLAYLIST + MOOD

 

Corridor 2021

BIG CITY, COOL DREAMS BY MARY SNIATKOWSKI

Words: Mary Sniatkowski
Photos: Dan Snyder
Mary Sniatkowski is a writer and marketing specialist living in New York City. Read about Mary's New York journey, and how she is discovering herself while exploring a new city.

After growing up in Vermont -- a place that only seemed cool once I left -- I did the coolest thing a person can do, I moved to New York City. I mean, come on. It’s a place filled with the cheat codes to cool; an afternoon at the Met, an evening on Manhattan’s most “urban-renewed” piers, drinks at the finest bars! Hell, anyone that lives outside New York would be impressed that I could visit the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree on a weekday (something I would never do). But, once I got here, I realized it’s cool to be in New York, but it’s not so easy to BE cool in New York. The Met gets 7 million visitors a year, urban renewal is superficial as fuck and, as it turns out, we all read the same “Coolest Bars in New York” article. This early revelation forced me to realize that I needed to put in more effort than paying an amount I’m too embarrassed to disclose for a room that did not even have four real walls.

BIG CITY, COOL DREAMS BY MARY SNIATKOWSKI | BIG CITY, COOL DREAMS BY MARY SNIATKOWSKI | BIG CITY, COOL DREAMS BY MARY SNIATKOWSKI

Cool, as both a doctrine and a virtue, is something I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about. The revolving door of coolness, just as quick to allow entry as it is to dismiss, is entrancing. The irony that my obsession is decidedly uncool is something that’s not lost on me. It’s alright though, pining after cool has always been an insular struggle, well except for now.

My endeavour to cool in New York has led me to many discoveries. Walking the Brooklyn Bridge gets relaxing two thirds of the way in from the Manhattan side, any L Train Vintage is usually a nightmare but the one in Prospect Park has probably had the fewest Tik Toks made about it, Williamsburg is nice for a day and don’t disclose the places you think are cool on the internet. New York is about discovery anyway. Sometimes the random book store you spot from the street happens to sell hand-painted tote bags it describes unironically as “spiritually essential”. As far as I’m concerned, any object atheistically described as spiritually essential is cool. Beyond the financiers, the wall streeters, the broadway hopefuls, this kind of wackiness is just as integral to the city’s identity.

With Covid came the dormancy of the city’s wackiest corners. New York will forever be associated with big industry, but for the cracks in it’s facade to be filled, it needs the living, breathing in between. As the tide of vibrancy has pulled away from the city’s shores, it’s beached some of the places that mattered most to New York’s ecosystem. What it’s also done however, is revealed the frivolity of cool. The Pavlovian anxiety born from cosmic uncertainty has pushed my obsession to the furthest corners of cognition. In spite of this, I know the hum of New York isn’t completely gone, it’s resiliency gives me hope that when I can blissfully return to my pursuit of cool the city will 'be ready for me.

Corridor 2021

NY BY BRYNN WALLNER

Brynn Wallner is a creative director, painter, producer and freelance writer based out of New York City. Here are some of her paintings portraying how New York feels to her.

"Could the city have been my first true love? I grew up just across the Hudson River in Hoboken, New Jersey and started my freshman year of high school in downtown Manhattan. Commuting was kind of a bitch, but emerging from the subway every morning was like, oh my god, the energy. I'm in New York. After school I would meander around the city, avoiding homework in favor of aimless, dreamy walks, listening to music burned on CDs by new friends and crushes. Lou Reed... one fine morning she put on a New York station, she couldn't belieeeeve what she heard at all. The Virgin Mega Store in Union Square, tiny hidden streets in the West Village, my best friend's dark loft on Walker Street, the American Apparel on Broadway. All these places I spent wasting time when it wasn't time wasted at all. It was a love affair, a New York education!"

-Brynn Wallner      

NY BY BRYNN WALLNER | NY BY BRYNN WALLNER | NY BY BRYNN WALLNER | NY BY BRYNN WALLNER

Corridor 2021

MAY PLAYLIST + MOOD

Here's May - the trees are really starting to turn a new leaf; spring time is officially here. Time to pull out the picnic blankets and find a shady spot with friends - happy park season.

MAY PLAYLIST + MOOD | MAY PLAYLIST + MOOD | MAY PLAYLIST + MOOD | MAY PLAYLIST + MOOD | MAY PLAYLIST + MOOD

 

Corridor 2021

PHOTO WALK IN FT. GREENE PARK

JOIN US ON A PHOTO WALK IN FORT GREENE PARK WITH LONG TIME FRIEND AND MODEL, AMBROSE.

The sun is out and the weather is nice, a perfect time to be in Ft Greene. Here's park in all its early spring glory. 

PHOTO WALK IN FT. GREENE PARK PHOTO WALK IN FT. GREENE PARK PHOTO WALK IN FT. GREENE PARK PHOTO WALK IN FT. GREENE PARK

 

Corridor 2021

INTERVIEW WITH BLACKBIRD SPYPLANE

BLACKBIRD SPYPLANE IS A SUBSTACK (www.blackbirdspyplane.com), WRITTEN BY JOURNALIST JONAH WEINER AND DESIGN SCOUT ERIN WYLIE FOCUSED ON "UNBEATABLE RECON" INTO STYLE AND CULTURE. READ DAN'S INTERVIEW ABOUT THE DESIGN AND ORIGINS OF OUR SEASONAL CARDIGANS.

A few weeks ago, after we shouted out some flannels from NYC’s Corridor, that brand’s head designer & founder, Dan Snyder, hit us up to recommend a COOL book about fractals and ALSO to see if we wanted to SpyBless our “unbeatable readers” with some dope SS21 Corridor pieces — for instance, he asked, did we want to lavish the SpyFamily with a couple of his excellent new cardigans??

Our reply … was “O let’s do it.”

HAND CROCHET CARDIGAN INTERVIEW WITH BLACKBIRD SPYPLANE HAND CROCHET CARDIGAN INTERVIEW WITH BLACKBIRD SPYPLANE

“We've been working with this women's collective in Peru for the past few years and these have been in the works for over a year,” Dan said. “The flower cardigans are hand crocheted and take about 80 hours per sweater… First each flower is crocheted, and then all knitted together… The yarn is really nice too - it's a mercerized pima cotton which has a beautiful color.”

The floral motifs are perfect for swaggily camouflaging yrself at a BOTANIC GARDEN… (extra props if you accessorize with one of Story Mfg.’s floral-crochet scarves.)

We got Dan on the phone for more intel. “I was in Peru a year and a half ago and started seeing them use this mercerized cotton, which has this great vibrancy,” he said. “At the time I was listening to a lot of Beatles records, and my eye caught on this vest Paul wore during Magical Mystery Tour — it’s a similar hand-crocheted deal. I showed the workshop a picture, and we developed a stitch and played around with different yarns. It’s called a double rice stitch and it’s used a lot in Japanese knitwear. We combined that yarn with the Magical Mystery Tour thing, mocked up three colors, and boom.

“So those are made through a workshop run by this lady Eunice, and I’m on WhatsApp with her every day. I like working with small operations because you can f*ck around, you don’t have to produce huge orders. Then across town in Lima there’s this guy Froilan, who does a lot of space-dyeing.

“I wanted to use it for a cardigan, to get a kind of Missoni effect, but less precise.”

We R hooking up the Classified SpyFriends with 2 cardigans — one of the floral joints & one of the space-dye joints — toss yr name in the BBSP virtual bucket hat between now & Saturday May 1:

Win a fire CORRIDOR cardi

If yr in NYC Dan recommends that you 1) go check out the Alice Neel show at the Met and 2) go check out the water lily pond at the Bronx Botanical Garden and he also recommends the novel Girl, Woman, Other, by Bernardine Evaristo, “about an experience I don’t know anything about, the Afro-Caribbean experience of London — she writes from this place that’s incredibly complete, where every character is beautiful and horrible, just a realistic portrait of how people are.”

Corridor 2021

NY REBIRTH WITH COBEY ARNER

COBEY ARNER IS A PHOTOGRAPHER, MUSICIAN IN THE BAND REBOUNDER, AND GENERAL MAN ABOUT TOWN. HE LIVES IN THE LOWER EAST SIDE.

"It's primetime to start living again and I wouldn't want to be anywhere else. Here is New York, depicted in thirteen images, across three boroughs and three seasons. Always here to offer a warm hug or at least a polite head nod."

-CA      

NY Rebirth with Cobey Arner NY Rebirth with Cobey Arner NY Rebirth with Cobey Arner NY Rebirth with Cobey Arner

Corridor 2021

SUN PAINTED HOUSES

 

Corridor SS21 Sun Painted Houses combines the ideas of how nature interacts with man made materials, handm knitting, finishing and natural dyes. Designer, Dan Snyder, focused on replicating nature and natural practices. The concepts, colors and themes are derived from natural motifs and hand finishes, Better Homes and Gardens Magazines from 1994-1996, the Fibonacci sequence and feeling relaxed and contented in one’s body.